I’d like to share some best practices on approaching a lead over the phone.
KickFactory’s background is in data science. We started building an artificial intelligence engine back in 2013 that brands used to target consumer intent. Think of it like “those ads that follow you around the Internet.” You know when you say talk with a friend about buying a new car and then you get car ads for the next 2 weeks in your Facebook feed. KickFactory found a less intrusive way to do this through better contextualized messaging.


Our technology allowed us to speak with 4.8M consumers for 52 of the Fortune 1000 brands since 2013. We’ve sold products, services, and generated leads, all in the name of growing the businesses bottomline while at the same time helping the consumer. 


Through millions of conversations and their associated data points we’ve learned about human behavior – what motivates, what inspires people to action, and the best ways to approach people seemingly “out of the blue.”
Let me summarize those learnings in 3 points and then talk you through how to apply them to the leads you’re working off KickFactory Events.


Context

Conversation

Closing

Let’s walk through an example.

Let’s say you’re notified about a fire at 742 Evergreen Terrance through KickFactory Events. And from the event page you can see Mr. & Mrs. Simpson.

Let’s further assume this event has caught your eye and decide it’s a loss you’d like to pursue. After using the Reserve feature to make sure no one else grabs it, you decide to start with a phone call. Here’s how I would coach you to have that call.

You: ***dials phone number
Mr. Simpson: Hello?
You: Hello Mr. Simpson. This is Scott Lewis from the Restoration Company. I saw on the wire this afternoon you’ve had a fire at your home. Is everyone OK?
Mr. Simpson: Yes, everyone is OK. 
You: Great. I’m glad to hear that. [PAUSE] I know that your head is probably spinning right now with all that you have to do to begin putting your home back together. I’ve seen it first hand on the 783 families I’ve done restoration for in our area over the last 10 years.
Mr. Simpson: OK.
You: Would it OK if I came and walked the property with you to help you asses the damage and where to go from here? We don’t charge for estimates. We may be able to help you or I may be able to refer to one of the other great companies in our area.
Mr. Simpson: OK
You: I’ll get in my truck and head over now. See you in 15 minutes.
Some things to point out.
First, the phone call itself won’t be long. It may be less than 2 minutes in some cases. Your job is to lead through the key points – who you are, why you’re calling them, social proof that you’re someone who can help them, and the permission to come visit them in person.
Second, you need to use a script. You cannot wing calls like these. You need to know your points and how to quickly move to your close – the permission for the visit. It’s OK if you need to read your script for a while.
Third, if Mr. Simpson starts asking questions, making objections, or simply starts rambling, let him completely finish his thought, and then go right back to where you left off on the script. Remember, you’ve worked many-many-many jobs like this before. This may be the first time Mr. Simpson has experienced a loss in his home or business and his thinking may not be clear. Your job is help him make decisions that help put his life back together. You do this by working your script and getting his permission for a visit. 
Fourth, don’t worry about how Mr. Simpson may receive your call. He’s not thinking about you, your business, or anything other than “my world has been interrupted and I need things to go back to the way they were yesterday.” If you keep the focus on him and how you can help restore his world, that’s what he needs.
Finally, focus on empathy – being able to see and feel the situation from his perspective. This is why I encourage to open by asking “is everyone OK?” And not “Can I come and asses the property?” Having spoken to 4.8M consumers in a moment of need we’ve learned that empathy creates loyalty and endearment. All things being equal between 3 restorers, the customer will choose to work with the guy they like best and can trust.
KickFactory Events provides you context for these conversations with home and business owners who’ve experienced a loss so that you can successfully close more business.

Mr. Simpson: Hello?
You: Hello Mr. Simpson. This is Scott Lewis from the Restoration Company. I saw on the wire this afternoon you’ve had a fire at your home. Is everyone OK?
Mr. Simpson: Yes, everyone is OK. 
You: Great. I’m glad to hear that. [PAUSE] I know that your head is probably spinning right now with all that you have to do to begin putting your home back together. I’ve seen it first hand on the 783 families I’ve done restoration for in our area over the last 10 years.
Mr. Simpson: OK.
You: Would it OK if I came and walked the property with you to help you asses the damage and where to go from here? We don’t charge for estimates. We may be able to help you or I may be able to refer to one of the other great companies in our area.
Mr. Simpson: OK
You: I’ll get in my truck and head over now. See you in 15 minutes.

Some things to point out.

First, the phone call itself won’t be long. It may be less than 2 minutes in some cases. Your job is to lead through the key points – who you are, why you’re calling them, social proof that you’re someone who can help them, and the permission to come visit them in person.

Second, you need to use a script. You cannot wing calls like these. You need to know your points and how to quickly move to your close – the permission for the visit. It’s OK if you need to read your script for a while.

Third, if Mr. Simpson starts asking questions, making objections, or simply starts rambling, let him completely finish his thought, and then go right back to where you left off on the script. Remember, you’ve worked many-many-many jobs like this before. This may be the first time Mr. Simpson has experienced a loss in his home or business and his thinking may not be clear. Your job is help him make decisions that help put his life back together. You do this by working your script and getting his permission for a visit. 

Fourth, don’t worry about how Mr. Simpson may receive your call. He’s not thinking about you, your business, or anything other than “my world has been interrupted and I need things to go back to the way they were yesterday.” If you keep the focus on him and how you can help restore his world, that’s what he needs.

Finally, focus on empathy – being able to see and feel the situation from his perspective. This is why I encourage to open by asking “is everyone OK?” And not “Can I come and asses the property?” Having spoken to 4.8M consumers in a moment of need we’ve learned that empathy creates loyalty and endearment. All things being equal between 3 restorers, the customer will choose to work with the guy they like best and can trust.

KickFactory Events provides you context for these conversations with home and business owners who’ve experienced a loss so that you can successfully close more business.

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